We All Have To Eat

Our favorite time with our guests is when we sit down, family style at the kitchen table, and share a meal. There is something special about breaking bread together. It’s hard to explain, but it seems like it’s easier for people to let their guards down, and you get to know them in a way you might not have otherwise. It’s a time when no one is trying to prove anything to anyone. It doesn’t matter if you have three horses of your own and the person next to you is here to overcome their fear of horses all together. We’ve been blessed to have people from all walks of life, all around the globe, and every class level sit at the table. The beautiful thing is, everyone has to eat. It’s as basic as that. It creates a shared experience that acts as a jumping off point for conversation.

Depending on where you’re from you might hold your fork “upside down” in proper fashion, switching utensils throughout the meal. Or, you might hold your fork with a fist to eat everything on your plate. It is amazing to see how varied “proper manners” can be. For some, it’s considered polite to leave food on their plate as a way of showing the host that she provided you with more than enough to eat and you are satisfied. But for others, it is considered impolite to leave food on your plate, that by doing so you’re telling your host her food wasn’t good enough to finish. Even though they contradict each other, their good intentions are the same.

It got us thinking about what is considered normal and polite within our own families. Often times, there is a story behind it all. We would love to hear what your family mealtimes look like. It doesn’t matter if your napkins are made from fine fabric or 2-ply paper, we are just interested in learning about your traditions and culture. There’s room for everyone at the table!

Noon Break by Tom Ryan - One of our favorites that also hangs in our home

Noon Break by Tom Ryan – One of our favorites that also hangs in our home